How Head Injuries Can Happen On The Job

By Pyle Law, Reviewed by E. THomas Pyle January 19 2021 10:28 am
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How Head Injuries Can Happen On The Job

By Pyle Law, Reviewed by E. THomas Pyle January 19 2021 10:28 am
How Head Injuries Can Happen On The Job

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are among the most devastating injuries one can suffer, and far too often, they’re suffered at the hands of avoidable, all too preventable negligence. Such a condition can lead to memory loss, gradual neurodegeneration of the mind, nausea, and disorientation.

In many types of jobs, physical risks are often an inevitability, but a company has legal obligations to keep those risks to a minimum. If you suffered a head injury on the job, you may be entitled to worker’s compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages, and any other pain and suffering damages you may have sustained. 

Below are some of the most common head injury risks to watch out for and what your recourse should be in the wake of such an injury. If you want to discuss your specific situation, contact a Kansas workers’ compensation attorney right away. 

Common Causes of Workplace Head Injuries

Workers can suffer head trauma on the job for many reasons, and here are some of the most prominent sources of head injuries to watch out for:

  • Motor Vehicle Accidents: Commercial drivers face all the same roadway risks that civilian drivers do. Furthermore, workplaces where vehicles are operated on the premises, like construction sites or warehouses with forklift operators, are also not immune to such risks of injury. From 2011 to 2017, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 614 workers lost their lives in forklift accidents, and 7,000 more suffered from nonfatal injuries. 
  • Slip And Fall: Blue collar or white collar, you could trip anytime and anywhere, regardless of the sort of workplace environment you’re working with. Sometimes we lose footing through the pure virtue of our own clumsiness, but other falls happen due to workplace conditions. Damaged flooring, debris on the ground, torn or worn carpeting, and spills are all risk factors that could cause slip and falls.
  • Falling Objects: Any workplace environment where heavy machinery is operated and any heavy objects are lifted is susceptible to falling object injuries. Falling objects are one of OSHA’s “Fatal Four” leading causes of workplace deaths in construction settings, and explosions can also hurl falling debris in your direction. There is always the chance that falling objects can hit someone on the head. 

Some workplace accidents are unavoidable, while others happen for preventable reasons. However, workers’ compensation is a no-fault system, so injured workers can file a claim for benefits no matter what caused the accident. Benefits can include medical treatment coverage, lost wages, and disability payments for extended periods away from work. If, however, someone unaffiliated with your employer was negligent and caused your head injury, you might also have a third-party claim against that party in addition to your workers’ compensation claim. 

Seek Help from a Trusted Kansas Workers’ Compensation Attorney

If you were involved in a workplace accident and suffered a severe head injury, don’t hesitate to contact Pyle Law for help. Workers’ compensation claims can be complicated, and many people can overcome obstacles with the help of the right Kansas workers’ compensation attorney. Get in touch with attorney Tom Pyle today for a free initial consultation.

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E. THOMAS PYLE

Pyle Law was founded in 1999 with a commitment to fewer clients and better service. We believe that each and every client is important and everyone is entitled to justice and equal protection under our laws. We make every case a priority and are committed to keeping each client informed about the status of their case. We do not guarantee results, but we do guarantee effort.

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This page has been written, edited, and reviewed by a team of legal writers following our comprehensive editorial guidelines. This page was approved by attorney E. Thomas Pyle who has more than 20 years of legal experience as a practicing personal injury trial attorney.